Chewing Gum Consultant

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3D food 15/02/2017

Filed under: Production & Machinery,Research — Joan Mestres @ 10:06 AM
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In this post I will allow myself to move outside the world of chewing gum and jump into the larger “food industry” field.

After the eye-opening experience I had during last ISM, and that I discussed in previous posts, about the production of 3D chewing gum, I’ve done a bit of research on internet on the 3D Food printing matter. I have found a few interesting things that I’d like to share with you.

For sure this field (making food with a 3D printer) is complete novelty in all aspects. However there are restaurants that are already using this technology. I found one not far from home:

MIRAMAR in the Costa Brava, about 100km north of Barcelona (and not far from where the world-famous Ferran Adria’s “El Bulli” was located) is one of them. Miramar’s Chef Paco Pérez, with 2 Michelin stars experiements and develops 3D dishes.

This is a link to an interesting article in the New York Times that discusses some of the issues and controversies which curound this fascinating new paradigma. Will this machines become part of a common kitchen? What new possibilites do they offer in terms of tastes, textures, ingredients and composition of the food…?

Finally, a link to the website of Foodini the printer used by Paco Pérez, where you can side excellent pictures of 3D food and discover more about the machine. I reccommend the FAQs section!

 

Oral care claims – Perfetti 18/01/2017

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 5:30 PM
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Oliver Nieburg informs that Perfetti Van Melle has been fined with 180.000 Eur for misleading claims associated to their chewing gum (Mentos, Happydent, Vivident and Daygum). The company rejects the accusation and says that “All claims on products are in compliance with relevant food legislation and fully scientifically supported”.

I must admit that I always found this field (what claims can be associated to the product) very difficult. Maybe because I am chemist and not lawyer, so when I dive into all these different legislations in each country, the different definitions (e.g. what is considered “organic”, or what is “natural”, …) and what can be claimed or not… I get a bit confused. However, it is very exciting and interesting to see what goes on and to learn more and more about this.

 

Here the link to the article

 

Hemp Chewing Gum 12/01/2017

Filed under: New product,Research — Joan Mestres @ 1:24 PM
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I want to forward to you today the article published by Confectionerynews.com about the functionality of a chewing gum that contains Cannabidiol (CBD).

The article mentions that inital bioavailability studies show promising results and now the company AXIM Biotech (specialized on research of products containing cannabis) will start clinical trials directed to alleviate symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). The bioavailability studies have been conducted with chewing gum containg 30mg of CBD. The current product in the market contains only 10mg of CBD. It is marketed in the USA under the brand Canchew(R). See the link here for the website of the product: Canchew

The gum is made by tabletting process instead of the traditional extrusion process. This is more familiar to pharmaceutical companies and one the best solutions to use chewing gum as delivery system for active ingrendients. The tabletting process has many advanatges (e.g. is done at low temperature, so it does not damage the active ingredient) but also some disadvantages (the chewing profile of the final product is not as “good” as a standard chewing gum, due to the hardness and the dryness of the piece).

Here is the link to the full article from Confectionerynews.com

 

Chewing gum that changes flavour to detect disease 09/06/2015

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 11:55 AM
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Today I post about an advanced use of chewing gum. I attach a link to the article which describes the research that it is being conducted, within the EU frame, about the use of chewing gum for an early detection of some oral diseases.

This type of reasearch can lead to other interesting and useful applications in the future!

 

XYLITOL IN CHEWING GUM 01/04/2015

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 11:32 AM
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I leave you here a link to the article published in confectionerynews.com where you can see the discussion about the validity of the claim about the value of xylitol as oral care agent.

The article does not deal only about chewing gum. It mentions other products with xylitol (lozenges, toothpaste, …). The conclusion is that the effect is not as proven and clear as other studies suggest. Well… it is always good a bit of discussion and debate…

 

Stabilised Menthol Plus – Tastetech (UK) 25/02/2015

Filed under: New product,Research — Joan Mestres @ 4:38 PM
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I refer today to the advertised launching from the company Tastetech, in Bristol – UK.

The company says that their product “stabilized menthol plus” is a fine menthol powder which offers the following benefits:

1- Saves up to 50% of your menthol costs

2- Contains 95% menthol

3- Gives you 5 fold more impact

4- Is a free flowing powder

5- It is resistant to recrystallization

6- It is easy to dose

and (this is the reason to include it here) it is suitable for chewing gum.

It can be used to replace the larger menthol crystals that are used by the industry. Other menthol in powder in the market contain a much lower amount of pure menthol because a large percentage of carrier (starch or gum acacia) is used.

 You can read more about this product on their website www.tastetech.com 
 

New coating process patented by Perfetti 11/12/2014

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 9:06 AM
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As coating the gum is always one of the most critical, and at the same time, one of the most important, steps of the production process, I thought this news appeared yesterday would be of your interest.

The new patent, filed by Perfetti, claims that there is no use of the usual wax or shellac at the final stage of the coating. Instead, this patent, describes the use of powder at the final stage of the coating. By doing so they obtain what they call “satin effect”. Here you have the link to the article published by Confectionery news.

If we review the usual coating process, carried out inside a coating pan which turns continuously, we find three main steps:

1- Initial stage /Gumming. When we add a layer of gumming agent (gum arabic) on the surface of the gum. The reason for this is to fill the holes on the rough surface of the gum and to help the next layer to adhere to the gum center.

2- Engrossing stage. Where we add several syrup charges to the gum center. The syrup is a solution of sugar (or poliol in case of sugar free products) with water. When the syrup is added all the centers get wet (there is “distribution” phase) and then they are dried with air, so the water evaporates and the sugar/poliol remains on the surface. This is repeated many times until the producer obtains the required weight of coating in the piece. Choosing the right poliol and drying the surface in a proper way will result on a crunchy coating, which is what the final consumer appreciates. This engrossing stage is time-consuming so all producers try to optimize the procedure in a way that the maximum amount of coating is obtained in the shortest possible time. One of the options is the use of syrup with higher concentration of solids (sugar or poliol). In this case, as we are adding more solid material every time we add the syrup, the coating is formed faster. However this will result on a rough surface which is not interesting. More diluted syrup will give a soother and nicer surface, but the coating time will be longer. Another option is to add the syrup faster (more additions per unit of time), but as the syrup wets the centers they become sticky and this practice has the risk of obtaining many pieces that stick together one to the other, which of course is not acceptable.

3- Final stage /Polishing. Once we have the coating layer that we want, we use shellac to seal and protect the gum piece and wax to make it shine. Usually this stage is not a major problem and does not require much time or expertise.

This final stage is the one that the Patent eliminates. Instead, it uses the addition of powder at the final stage. The powder will help dry the last addition of syrup. In fact this technique is used on what is called “soft coating”, which is used for other products. This technique (drying with powder) does not result on a crunchy product but reduces the coating time considerably. Jellies are coated at the engrossing stage with this “soft coating” technique because they do not need to be crunchy. This procedure described in the patent uses it only at the last stage, so I do not know the effect it will have on the final result. For sure the product will be less shiny (that’s why the name “satin effect”) due to the lack of wax. I do not know how this will affect the acceptance by the consumers, who usually prefer shiny and crunchy chewing gums.