Chewing Gum Consultant

Professional Chewing gum industry meeting point

CB12 – Meda 29/03/2017

The Swedish company MEDA (belonging to Mylan (USA) since mid 2016) has the nice “CB12 boost”. It is designed to fight the bad breath and for this prupose contains Zinc (in form af zinc acetate dihydrate) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The foremr is supposed to reduce the sulphur gases which cause the bad breath, the later is a well recongized agent in the oral care field which contributes to the maintenance of the tooth mineralization. It is also formulated with xylitol, which plays a role in this action.

This is another example of tabletted gum. It has two different layers (one white and the other blue), with the brand name “CB12” engraved in one of them. It some in two different flavors: Mint and Eucalyptus. website: CB12

The product is patented (Nr. 1 589 825) by GumLink, the danish company.

The CB12 range has also a mouthwash that has the same purpose, so both products complement each other.

 

 

 

XYLITOL IN CHEWING GUM 01/04/2015

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 11:32 AM
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I leave you here a link to the article published in confectionerynews.com where you can see the discussion about the validity of the claim about the value of xylitol as oral care agent.

The article does not deal only about chewing gum. It mentions other products with xylitol (lozenges, toothpaste, …). The conclusion is that the effect is not as proven and clear as other studies suggest. Well… it is always good a bit of discussion and debate…

 

Daeyoung Foods – Korea 02/03/2015

Filed under: Market & Fairs,New product — Joan Mestres @ 5:35 PM
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This korean company (www.deayoungfoods.co.kr) might not be one of the big players in the country (Like Lotte, Haiti, Orion,…) but their product is outstanding.

They had a booth in ISM and I had the pleasure to talk to Mr Rhee. They produce other products than gum, but …  their chewing gum portfolio is really interesting!

Most of the products are xylitol based, aligned with what the market demands in that part of the world. But the company gives them a very nice final touch which differentiates them from the competition. See this photo that I took from the “Rainbow gum”. Isn’t it an appealing way to present the dragees? When I see this, the rest of sugarfree gums risk to look too boring.

 

rainbow gum korea

 

 

The range of gums is completed with other “not-so-common” types of gum: Tube gum, gum in cubes (I talked about this type of presentation in my previous post) and also functional gum, with three different products:

“No sleep Gum” containing guaraná

Vitamin Gum, with vitamins A, B, C, D and E

Polyphenol gum, with antioxidant properties

and Aloe Gum which contains, of course, Aloe Vera.

Daeyoung Foods also exports to a number of countries and has been growing in the last years.

 

Sugarfree gum and Gingivitis 03/11/2014

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 12:01 PM
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I would like to sure with you today this article published by Confectionerynews.com about the effect of sugar free gum on gingivitis. In particular the study mentions xylitol and maltitol gums, not gums with other bulk sweeteners.

This is the link to the article:  Gingivitis and chewing gum

and this is the link to the clinical study itself: International Journal of Dental Hygiene 

One more study to add in the list of oral care benefits of the chewing gum.

 

Sweet Bites – USA 29/08/2014

Filed under: New product — Joan Mestres @ 7:40 PM
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Tasty chewing gum that prevents tooth decay for impoverished children around the world.

 

A good initiative with chewing gum!

5 students of the University of Pennsylvania founded Sweet Bites Gum some time ago. The company aims to support the dental health of children in areas where there is not the required infrastructure. They are focusing for the time being in India and launched the project in Bangalore (although planning to expand to other areas like the Phillippines as well). They are distributing xylitol gum (50.000 pieces so far!) among the children in these communities. The wrapper of the gum includes a text with a message reinforcing good habits related to oral care.

They are trying to scale up their activities by means of crowfunding. I invite you to check their website and learn more about this exceptional project, which is competing for the Hulk Price for Social entrepreneurship.

This is the web site;

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sweet-bites-cavity-fighting-xylitol-gum

 

 

Oral Care Gum 27/06/2013

Filed under: Research — Joan Mestres @ 10:21 AM
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Oral Care has been (and is) the largest segment of functionality for the chewing gum industry. From the original sugared gums, the concern that they can damage our teeth grows in almost every country so there is a clear shift towards sugar free (sometimes called “sugarless”) products. Market figures show this very clearly: While sugared gum sales are falling in almost every country year after year, sugarfree gum performance shows good health. But when we ask “How good is a sugarfree gum for our teeth?” we are due to start a tricky discussion. As there is no doubt that chewing a gum that contains no sugar will be better for our teeth than a sugared one, there is a controversy about some aspects like:

– Does it remineralize teeth?

– Does it neutralize plaque acids?

Many studies have been conducted and some tests have been defined. One of the most extended ones is carried out by an organization located in Basel, Switzerland named “Toothfriendly international”. They use in vivo pH telemetry tests to check if a product generates a decrease in pH in the mouth of the user below 5,7. Below this figure, it is considered to be too acidic and so potentially cariogenic and/or erosive. Sugared products usually give a result below 5,7. When a product does not generate this acidity in the mouth, the organization grants the producer the use of the “Happy tooth” logo in the packaging:

You can read more details about the organization, the tests and the certification on their web site: www.toothfriendly.ch

Happy_Tooth

Then we can go into legislative field, which differs in each country and allows, or not, claim certain advantages. For instance, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) allows some particular claims.

A good summary of those claims are explained by Oliver Nieburg in his article “Sugar-free gum for dental health: Innovations in science”

The article mentions ingredients that have been around for many years: Xylitol, Recaldent, carbamide, peroxide, fluoride,… and highlights as well the controversy around some of them and the claims associated.

I would add some other ingredients that have been used in oral care gums since many years: Calcium orthophosphate (pH neutralizer), Sodium bicarbonate (pH neutralizer), Zirconium silicate (abrasive), Triclosan (bactericide), Clorhexidine, Papain, Zinc gluconate, Copper gluconate, Copper chlorophyllin, Parsley seed oil, Zinc acetate, Actizol, and even some enzymes such as Lactoperoxidase (LPO) or Glucoperoxidase (GPO).

In summary, oral care still is the leading trend driving chewing gum sales in most of the world, but research is needed in this field to have more solid ground for some claims.

 

Health claims in European chewing gums 04/04/2013

Today I send you the link to an article about the Health claims that are approved for a chewing gum by the European Union. The article mentions the mature Dutch market and says that functional claims are the way to keep a higher growth for the chewing gum compared to other confectionery products, but these functional chewing gums must keep a reasonable price.

It mentions the claims approved by EU, which include the use of ingredients such as carbamide, fluoride and xylitol.

Confectionery News functional Gum